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Trump Says Summit ‘May Not Work Out For June 12’ But South Korea’s Moon Has ‘Every Confidence’ In Trump’s Deal-Making Ability

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WASHINGTON, May 22, 2018 — President Donald Trump on Tuesday told reporters a decision will be made soon on whether to proceed with his planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

“We’ll soon know,” Trump said while answering questions during a West Wing arrival ceremony for South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

During an Oval Office meeting with Moon shortly after, Trump said “we’ll see what happens,” but added that talks between the two countries are “moving along.”

A moment later, however, he appeared to balance his desire to have an air of confidence with the reality of the situation.

“If it doesn’t happen, maybe it will happen later,” he said.

“You never know about deals…..I’ve made a lot of deals. You never really know,” Trump continued. “It may not work out for June 12.”

Trump said South Korea, China and Japan are “willing to help….to make North Korea great,” but he also appeared to blame China for the North’s recent change in tone.

“There was a difference when [Kim] left China a second time,” he noted.

When Trump asked Moon what he thought of Kim’s second meeting, Moon replied that he knows people are skeptical about the summit because it will be “the first time there will be an agreement among the leaders,” but added that Trump is “the person who is in charge.”

“President Trump has been able to achieve this dramatic change,” Moon said, adding further that he has “every confidence” that Trump can negotiate a deal that would bring about an end to the Korean War and deliver “peace and prosperity” for the North.

The summit had been set to take place in Singapore on June 12, but those plans appeared to be in jeopardy last week after the North reacted to suggestions by Trump’s national security advisor, former UN Ambassador John Bolton that the United States would seek to have Pyongyang disarm in exchange for sanctions relief in the same manner as deposed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadaffi.

But Trump appeared to back away from Bolton’s comments by suggesting that Kim’s government would have American assistance in staying in office if it were to give up its nukes.

“We will guarantee his safety,” Trump said, adding that security guarantees had been under discussion “from the beginning,” and that a denuclearization deal would leave Kim safe and happy while making his country rich.

“I think that he will be extremely happy if something works out,” he said. “If you look 25 years into the future, 50 years into the future, he will be able to look back and be very proud of what he did for North Korea and, actually, for the world.  But he will be very proud of what he did for North Korea.”

 

This story has been updated

 

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Andrew Feinberg is the Managing Editor and lead Washington Correspondent for Breakfast Media, and covers the White House, Capitol Hill, courts and regulatory agencies for BeltwayBreakfast and BroadbandBreakfast.com. He has written about policy and politics in the nation's capital since 2007.

Foreign Policy

Kudlow Holds Administration’s Line On Turkey Steel Tariff — Says Increase Not Connected To Evangelical Pastor’s Plight Despite Evidence To Contrary

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WASHINGTON, August 16, 2018 — White House National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow said on Thursday that President Trump’s decision to subject steel imports from Turkey to a fifty percent tariff was not in any way connected to the president’s ire over the Turkish government’s treatment of Andrew Brunson, an American evangelical pastor, despite the increase occurring shortly after the Trump administration imposed sanctions in retaliation for his continued detainment on terrorism charges.

“They [the tariffs] are not connected to that story — I think, basically, that the president was dissatisfied with Turkey on trade,” Kudlow said, noting that the tariffs are “subject to constant negotiations.”

Kudlow added that he personally thinks Turkey should release Brunson, but stressed that “policy-wise,” the decision to expand not connected. He declined to say whether the sanctions would be tightened if Brunson is not released, but said Trump “will keep everybody up to speed.”

Brunson, 50, had lived in Turkey for 23 years when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government arrested him in the wake of a 2016 coup attempt on accusations of being a follower of Fetullah Gulen, a Turkish pastor who lives in the United States as an expatriot.

Erdogan says Gulen and his movement, which Turkey considers a terrorist organization, were the masterminds behind the attempted putsch. It is believed that Erdogan’s government continues to hold Brunson as a bargaining chip to force the United States to extradite Gulen, but the Trump administration has not as yet been receptive to the idea.

The White House announced the tariff increase in an August 10 presidential proclamation, shortly after the Trump administration announced it would impose economic sanctions on Turkey in response to the decision by Erdogan’s government to keep  Brunson, on house arrest rather than release him outright,  Both announcements came after both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence began tweeting about Brunson’s plight, and after Pence wrote in a tweet that his release on house arrest was “not good enough.”

Despite the clear appearance of of a connection, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Wednesday said the sanctions would be lifted if Brunson is released, but the tariffs would remain.

The tariffs that are in place on steel would not be removed with the release of Pastor Brunson.  The tariffs are specific to national security.  The sanctions, however, that have been placed on Turkey are specific to Pastor Brunson and others that we feel are being held unfairly,” said Sanders.

However, Sanders could not name a specific national security concern that prompted the tariff move.

“The President has been clear about the steel and aluminum industries — steel particularly in this case — that those are industries that must be protected.  And we must have the ability to reach certain levels of manufacturing of those products here in the United States for the purposes of national security,” she said.

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Foreign Policy

US Ambassador To UK Says Trump ‘Aware’ Of Giant Baby Blimp, Will Discuss Second Novichok Incident With May

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Volunteers check over the 'Trump Baby' balloon in advance of his planned maiden flight during President Trump's inaugural visit to London

WASHINGTON, July 6, 2018 — The United States’ Ambassador to the United Kingdom says President Donald Trump is aware of the numerous protests set to greet him when he arrives in London next week, including the large balloon depicting him as a phone-toting baby set to fly over Parliament for the duration of his visit.

“I think we’re all aware [of the protests],” Ambassador Robert “Woody” Johnson said Friday during a conference call with reporters.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan initially denied permission for the “Trump Baby” balloon — the brainchild of a U.K.-based crowdfunding campaign — to fly over Parliament but reversed course after more than 100,000 people signed an online petition.

The balloon is six meters in height and depicts the president as a diaper-clad infant holding a smartphone.

President Trump, Johnson said, appreciates the value of free speech as “one of the things that bind us together” in both the U.S. and U.K., but will be “very focused” on making sure the relationship between the two countries is improved and that American prosperity and security are enhanced by this trip.

The president’s reliance on helicopters to get to and from various locations around London and the UK is not out of any desire to avoid his seeing protesters, Johnson explained.

While Johnson acknowledged that getting Trump to and from some of the various sites he will visit “requires being in the air,” he said that the president will “use various modes of transportation.”

Johnson says Trump and May ‘are on the same page’ concerning Russian malfeasance despite Trump’s history of downplaying it

Johnson also said he thinks that Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May “are on the same page” when it comes to Russia’s malign activities, including Russia’s use of the chemical agent Novichok to poison an ex-spy and his daughter earlier this year. Residual poison left over from that attack is thought to have been what caused a British couple to be similarly stricken this past week.

Trump “was very receptive to what happened” to Sergei and Yulia Skripal — the Russian father and daughter who were poisoned — and “expelled 60 spies or people or whatever you want to call them very rapidly,” he said, adding that he knew that Trump and May would be discussing the matter when they meet at Chequers, the British Prime Minister’s country retreat.

However, Johnson did not address the numerous media reports which indicated that Trump was displeased with having to expel more Russian diplomats than other countries in retaliation for the poisoning or the statements made by Trump in which he downplayed Russia’s involvement or cast doubt on whether Vladimir Putin’s government was involved in the incident at all.

Trump has consistently refused to criticize Russia or its president and consistently downplays the extent of its malign activities

Trump has a history of downplaying or minimizing Russian malign activities dating back to his 2016 campaign for the presidency, during which he responded to a TV interview question about Putin’s history of murdering journalists by suggesting the U.S. “has a lot of killers” as well.

Since taking office, Trump has repeatedly denied that Russia interfered on his behalf in the 2016 election despite reports affirming such a conclusion having been issued by the U.S. intelligence community and the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

Trump’s refusal to acknowledge Russia’s international malfeasance also extends to its 2014 invasion of Ukraine. During an impromptu press conference last month, Trump suggested that the invasion — which was ordered by Putin — was actually the fault of then-President Barack Obama.

His reluctance to criticize Russia or Putin has continued through this month. During a July 5 campaign-style rally in Montana, Trump mocked critics who suggested that he should be wary of meeting with Putin, a former KGB officer, without any advisors or note takers.

“Putin’s fine,” Mr. Trump said. “He’s fine. We’re all fine. We’re people. Will I be prepared? Totally prepared. I’ve been preparing for this stuff my whole life.”

“Getting along with Russia, and getting along with China and getting along with other countries is a good thing,” he added, “not a bad thing.”

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Foreign Policy

Conway Tells Reporters ‘No Evidence’ Of Trump Plans To Withdraw US Troops From Germany Despite Reports That Pentagon Is Conducting Cost Analysis Of Withdrawal

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Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway speaks at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference

WASHINGTON, June 29, 2018 — Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway told reporters Friday that “there’s no evidence” of President Donald Trump wanting to pull American troops out of Germany despite a Washington Post report indicating that the Pentagon is examining the cost of doing just that.

“There’s no evidence of that,” Conway said after telling reporters “I will let you know” if there is any policy change regarding the military presence the United States has maintained in Germany since the end of the second world war.

On Friday, the Washington Post reported that the Pentagon began examining the cost of pulling American troops from bases in Germany after Trump expressed interest in doing so during a meeting with White House and Pentagon officials earlier this year.

Trump has often spoken negatively of the American military presence in Europe, which he says costs the U.S. millions of dollars and provides a security umbrella for which America’s European allies should be paying more.

An American withdrawal from Germany would be a boost to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s ambitions to regain Russia’s Soviet-era sphere of influence.

Nevertheless, Trump has repeatedly invoked North Atlantic Treaty Organization members’ failure to spend two percent on their national defense as evidence that NATO members “owe” the United States for the cost of their protection, and incorrectly described NATO as an organization to which member states pay “dues.”

When asked why the Pentagon would be examining the cost of withdrawing American troops from there after Trump had expressed interest in doing so, Conway replied that “nobody said those reports are accurate,” adding that Trump “is always examining our relationships across the globe — you’ve seen that.”

“He’s about to have his second big summit in five or six weeks time, first with the leader of North Korea, now with the leader of Russia,” Conway added, suggesting that President Trump was being more transparent than his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, because the summit was announced in advance.

Conway then negatively compared this week’s announcement to when Obama was caught on a hot microphone telling Putin that he’d have more flexibility to discuss US-Russia relations after the 2012 election when any actions dealing with US-Russia relations would not be used for election-related attacks.

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